Welcome to

Central BC Railway & Forestry Museum revives Prince George's captivating history back to

an era when the railway was the region's lifeline and forestry was becoming BC's future.

 

The Museum presents an interesting and fun industrial heritage attraction in a spacious

park-like setting, where visitors are free to enjoy a "hands on - climb aboard" experience.

 

All aboard!   

 

 

Important Information - COVID-19 Pandemic

 

 

In light of the ever changing environment of the COVID-19 virus, information offered by health authorities, and to align with City closures of public civic facilities, we will be closing the museum doors to the public effective immediately.

We apologize for any inconvenience and appreciate your understanding.

 

Exhibit: Beehive Burners Behind Us

Paintings of Beehive Burners in Central B.C. by Lou Englehart

March 2020 - T.B.A. 

DUE TO THE CURRENT COVID-19 PANDEMIC, THIS EXHIBIT IS NOT OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. 

Please visit our channel on YouTube "Central BC Railway and Forestry Museum" or the "Exhibit" section under COLLECTIONS for a virtual tour of the exhibit. 

WE HOPE TO OPEN THE EXHIBIT TO THE PUBLIC IN THE NEAR FUTURE. 

 

Thousands of sawmills and planers, large and small, littered British Columbia’s landscape throughout the mid-twentieth century. Enormous amounts of sawdust, bark and other waste wood accumulated at these sites. This biproduct was buried and burned in open pits in an attempt to control the refuse. 

As a follow up to these techniques, conical steel “beehive” burners were designed to incinerate waste wood in a controlled and safe way. They soon became a fixture at almost every saw and planer mill in the province.  The many burners in Prince George produced a lot of ash and smoke which caused the atmosphere to become clouded.  

It was clear to artist, Louis J.  Englehart (1915-1989), that the technology of the beehive burner would not be utilized forever due to their environmental impact. He travelled to mill sites and created watercolor sketches of the beehive burners he saw. Englehart used these sketches as the base of the paintings exhibited here. These sketches are now stored at the Royal BC Museum. It was important to Englehart to record the B.C. landscape before the burners vanished. 

The BC government enacted the Environmental Management Act in 1997. Burners now require a permit to burn wood waste. Today there are only 33 burning facilities in B.C. Many abandoned beehive burners can still be spotted in the Central Interior of B.C. They are slowly decaying and being absorbed by the natural landscape.

 


Admission*

$26.00* Family (2 adults & up to 3 children (3-12 years old))

$8.00* Adults

$7.00* Seniors (65+) and Students with ID

$5.00* Children (3-12). Children under 3 enjoy free admission. 

Rides on the Cottonwood Minirail Train are $3.00 per person per ride.

*For information on group rates and field trips, please call          (250) 563-7351.

*Plus applicable taxes.
*Subject to change. 

Upcoming events

Closure due to COVID-19 pandemic - March 17, 2020 to May 30, 2020

The museum is closed until further notice.

EXHIBIT: Beehive Burners Behind Us - March 25, 2020 to July 1, 2020

Paintings of Beehive Burners in Central B.C. by Lou Englehart (click on more>>)

Good Friday - April 10, 2020


» view all events